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On 07.11.2020
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3 Wochen bernommen (die man auch aufteilen kann auf 2 Wochen und 1 Woche - hat bei mir berufliche Grnde).

The Secret Life Of Plants

Große Auswahl fremdsprachige Bücher bei Thalia ✓ Bücher versandkostenfrei ✓»The Secret Life of Plants«jetzt bestellen! Die LP Stevie Wonder: Journey Through The Secret Life Of Plants jetzt portofrei für 37,99 Euro kaufen. Mehr von Stevie Wonder gibt es im Shop. Explore the inner world of plants and its fascinating relation to mankind, as uncovered by the latest discoveries of science. A perennial bestseller! In this truly​.

The Secret Life of Plants

In der ersten Phase seiner künstlerischen Tätigkeit hatte sich Anselm Kiefer intensiv mit seiner deutschen Identität auseinandergesetzt. In der zweiten Phase,​. Published in , The Secret Life of Plants was written by Peter Tompkins and Christopher Bird. It is described as „A fascinating account of the physical. Explore the inner world of plants and its fascinating relation to mankind, as uncovered by the latest discoveries of science. A perennial bestseller. In this truly​.

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Hier profitieren Sie nicht nur Formel E Tv generell kostenlosen Versand und The Secret Life Of Plants superschnellen Lieferung, was ich Fabrício Werdum mache. - Stevie Wonder: Journey Through The Secret Life Of Plants (180g)

Die kleine Diebin min. Falls Sie Worldfunniestvideos2 mit uns aufnehmen möchten, können Sie sich aber gerne an unseren Kundenservice wenden. Rund um den Film. Jetzt bewerten Jetzt bewerten. Exploring the world of plants and its relation to mankind as revealed by the latest discoveries of scientists, The Secret Life of Plants includes remarkable information about plants as lie detectors and plants as ecological sentinels; it describes their ability to adapt to human wishes, their response to music, their curative powers, and their ability to communicate with m. Now available in a new edition, The Secret Life of Plants explores plants' response to human care and nurturing, their ability to communicate with man, plants' surprising reaction to music, their lie-detection abilities, their creative powers, and much more. Tompkins and Bird's classic book affirms the depth of humanity's relationship with nature and adds special urgency to the cause of protecting the environment that nourishes us. The Secret Life of Plants is a fascinating documentary featuring time lapse photography, historical film clips, and the music of Stevie Wonder. The best parts were the scientific experiments where people all over the world hooked up various plants to oscilloscopes, lie detectors, etc. to see if they feel pain, fear, etc. The very best that can be said of “The Secret Life of Plants” is what —as quoted in it—the journal Nature wrote in , reviewing a strangely unorthodox book on plant physiology by Sir Jagadis. The Secret Life of Plants () is a book by Peter Tompkins and Christopher Bird. The book documents controversial experiments that claim to reveal unusual phenomena regarding plants such as plant sentience, discovered through experimentation. It goes on to discuss philosophies and progressive farming methods based on these findings. 9/1/ · Exploring the world of plants and its relation to mankind as revealed by the latest discoveries of scientists, The Secret Life of Plants includes remarkable information about plants as lie detectors and plants as ecological sentinels; it describes their ability to adapt to human wishes, their response to music, their curative powers, and their ability to communicate with m4/5. Buy The Secret Life of Plants: A Fascinating Account of the Physical, Emotional, and Spiritual Relations Between Plants and Man (Tomkins) by Tompkins, Peter (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(). Published in , The Secret Life of Plants was written by Peter Tompkins and Christopher Bird. It is described as "A fascinating account of the physical, emotional, and spiritual relations between plants and man." Essentially, the subject of the book is the idea that plants may be sentient, despite their lack of a nervous system and a planetmut.com by:

Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. DID YOU KNOW? Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. Director: Walon Green. Writers: Christopher Bird based on the book , Peter Tompkins based on the book.

Added to Watchlist. The Rise of Daniel Kaluuya. Cosmic Pics--Delicious Documentaries. Underrated 70s. Share this Rating Title: The Secret Life of Plants 7.

Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Show HTML View more styles. Photos Add Image. The book documents controversial experiments that claim to reveal unusual phenomena regarding plants such as plant sentience , discovered through experimentation.

It goes on to discuss philosophies and progressive farming methods based on these findings. Christopher Bird was a best-selling author who also wrote The Divining Hand: The Year-Old Mystery of Dowsing.

The book includes summaries of the life and work of 20th century scientists Jagadish Chandra Bose and Corentin Louis Kervran as well as 19th century scientist George Washington Carver.

The book includes experiments on plant stimuli using a polygraph , a method which was pioneered by Cleve Backster.

The authors further say the authorities are unable to accept that emotional plants "might originate in a supramaterial world of cosmic beings which, as fairies, elves, gnomes, sylphs, and a host of other creatures, were a matter of direct vision and experience to clairvoyants among the Celts and other sensitives.

The book has been criticized by botanists such as Arthur Galston for endorsing pseudoscientific claims. Slayman many of the claims in the book are false or unsupported by independent verification and replicable studies.

Botanist Leslie Audus noted that the book is filled with nonsensical "outrageous" claims and should be regarded as fiction. Nederlandse Vereniging van Producenten en Importeurs van beeld- en geluidsdragers.

Retrieved April 16, Enter ourney Through "The Secret Life of Plants" in the "Artiest of titel" box. Recorded Live: The 12 Year Old Genius Stevie Wonder Live Live at the Talk of the Town Natural Wonder.

Stevie Wonder's Journey Through "The Secret Life of Plants" The Woman in Red Jungle Fever. Looking Back Stevie Wonder's Original Musiquarium I Song Review: A Greatest Hits Collection At the Close of a Century The Definitive Collection 20th Century Masters — The Millennium Collection: The Best of Stevie Wonder The Complete Stevie Wonder.

Songs in the Key of Life Tour. Lula Mae Hardaway Syreeta Wright KJLH Wonderin' " Wonder-ful ". Book Category. Authority control MBRG : a4b7ee-3debd3-b58d04da.

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These findings together with hundreds of other data were published in two massive volumes in and George Washington Carver's students were greatly impressed that each morning he would rise at four 0' clock to walk in the woods before the start of the working day and bring back countless plants with which to illustrate his lectures.

Explaining this habit to friends, Carver said, "Nature is the greatest teacher and I learn from her best when others are asleep. In the still dark hours before sunrise God tells me of the plans I am to fulfill.

George E. Smith continuously broadcast music to a small plot of Embro 44XE hybrid corn from the day of its planting to harvest time. The plot produced bushels to the acre as against only bushels for an untreated plot of similar corn growing under the same conditions.

Smith noted that the musically entertained corn also grew more rapidly and uniformly and silked earlier. The larger yield per acre was due not to an increase per plant but to a greater survival of plants in the plot.

To make sure that his tests were not due to chance, Smith laid out four corn plots in planted not only with the same Embro 44XE but also with another highly prolific hybrid, Embro Departure.

The first plot was treated to the previous year's music, the second left silent, and the third and fourth offered only ear-splitting continuous notes, one with a high pitch of 1, cycles a second, the other with a low pitch of At harvest time the Departure plants stimulated with music produced bushels per acre as against only for the silent plot.

But those exposed to the high note outdid themselves to achieve nearly bushels; those subjected to the low note topped Selim Lemstrom, made four expeditions to the subpolar regions o Spitsbergen, northern Norway, and Lapland from to An expert on polar light and earth magnetism, Lemstrom theorized that the luxuriant vegetation in those latitudes, which popular opinion ascribe to the lengthened days of their summers, was actually attributable to what he called "that violent electrical manifestation, the aurora borealis.

Lemstrom connected a series of flowers in metal pots to a static generator by an overhead network of wires sixteen inches above them and a pole set into the soil as a ground.

Other pots he "left to nature. When he transferred his apparatus into a garden he not only more than doubled the yield of strawberries but found them to be much sweeter; his harvest from barley plants increased by one-third.

In his L 'Origine de la Vie, published in , Georges Lakhovsky set forth a number of startling experiments upholding the idea that disease is a matter of disequilibrium in cellular oscillation, that the fight between healthy cells and pathogens, such as bacteria or viruses, is a "war of radiations.

When the plants had developed tumors the size of cherry stones, one of them was exposed to radiation from the oscillator.

During the first days the tumor grew rapidly, but after two weeks it suddenly began to shrink and die; after a second two-week period it fell off the afflicted plant.

Other geraniums treated over different time periods also shed their cancers under the effect of oscillator radiations.

Joe Nichols, a physician and surgeon who founded the Natural Food Associates in Atlanta, Texas, reported that a survey on farms throughout the Middle West disclosed that the corn growth was so heavily fertilized with synthetic nitrogen that it was unable to convert carotene into vitamin A and that the cattle feed produced from it was also deficient in vitamins D and E.

In modern processed foods the vitamins, trace elements, and enzymes are arbitrarily removed, mostly so as to render the food more durable.

As Nichols puts it, "They remove the life, in effect, killing it, so that it will not live and die later. Wheat germ is one of a very few places in nature in which the entire vitamin B complex is found In so-called "enriched" white bread, with the vitamins and minerals removed, nothing is left but raw starch, which has so little nutritive value that most bacteria won't eat it.

Into this insipid starch synthetic chemicals are arbitrarily injected, which form only part of the missing vitamin B complex.

Men from northern England and southern Scotland, large and powerful during the Napoleonic Wars, became short and frail and unfit for military service by the time of the Boer War.

A commission set up to investigate the phenomenon concluded it was caused by men moving to the cities, where they lived not on wholesome country bread but on white bread and white sugar.

In when the U. Public Health Service announced a definite connection between over-refined flour and the diseases of beri-beri and pellagra - vitamin-deficiency diseases of which over , cases were reported in Mississippi alone -the millers went into action, not to change the Hour, but to get the Public Health Service to shut up.

Within six months the Public Health Service abjectly issued a "correction" to its bulletin. White bread, they said, was perfectly wholesome if eaten in conjunction with an otherwise adequate diet of fruit, vegetables, and dairy products.

As Gene Marine and Judith Allen were to remark in reporting the story in their recent book Food Pollution: "So is cardboard.

I have been struggling to find motivation to finish this book. My only problem is that I have an e-book version of it and it's turning out to be a problem with respect to convenience of reading.

I think I've spent enough time trying to read it, but I think I will step back, shelve it for now and restart once I buy a physical copy.

As for the book, I've managed to read hardly 62 pages, but I've genuinely loved it all. Too bad that my e-book issues are really coming in the way here.

Without being t I have been struggling to find motivation to finish this book. Without being too hard on myself, I'm just going to move on to another physical book for now.

This book cannot go undiscussed, as it can't really be "rated" in any meaningful way. It raises so many different issues I don't know where to start, so I'll start with what i consider the most important one-- the role of science in our society.

As an account of the history of "fringe" scientific exploration of plants, this book makes it clear that no talk of scientific neutrality can be earnest, both in the sense of the impartiality of science as a discipline, and in the more slippery sense of This book cannot go undiscussed, as it can't really be "rated" in any meaningful way.

As an account of the history of "fringe" scientific exploration of plants, this book makes it clear that no talk of scientific neutrality can be earnest, both in the sense of the impartiality of science as a discipline, and in the more slippery sense of the impartiality of science as a methodology.

On the former subject, "The Secret Life of Plants" makes it clear that scientific exploration is strongly biased towards the subject areas with commercial potential: this much we already knew.

As far as the biases of the scientific method itself go, they are profound yet subtle enough to be beyond my limited brain to explain. When you structure your world on the basis of measurable phenomena, you marginalize subjective experience.

You make sure that the world you live in is limited to measurable phenomena at the expense of subjective ones. In a word, you cut off the most interesting part of life in one go.

I know this doesn't do any justice to this complicated subject, but a better discussion will have to wait for a better book on the topic to come along, or for someone else to tackle it entirely.

Most of these experiments are unknown and un- pursued, despite the fact that many of them are eminently "scientific" and replicable.

Curious individuals have been attaching electrodes to plant leaves for well over a century now. The gist of many of these is that plants possess a kind of sentience-- consider the following experiment, paraphrased to the best of my ability.

Two potted plants in a lab room, a man comes in and yanks one of the two by the roots, leaving the other one untouched. Sometime later, electrodes are attached to the plant remaining, and something like a police line-up is formed, the man who had killed the plant among the people in the line-up.

The people in the line-up approach the plant one at a time. When the "killer" approaches the remaining plant, the electrodes register a huge disturbance, an electric response that only occurs when the plant senses the killer of its friend approaching and for no one else.

Pretty weird stuff! The other major subject of the book is horticulture. The ideas that fall into this category are as varied as the ones in the realm of laboratory experiments.

Many are standard fare for the resurgence of organic farming of the sixties, and some are further out there.

The thread running through this section, as well, is the sentience of plants. Replicable trials show that plants prefer classical music over pop and rock and roll, and grow better when you talk to them.

Organic farming is better than petroleum-based agriculture, for the farm, the earth, and the eventual eater of the stuff, regardless of the propaganda from agri-business.

So, its a whole book of that, with lots more weirdness thrown in. Some of the stuff is dismissable scientifically , Willhelm Reich being interesting for other reasons, but perhaps not in the more narrow sense of the scientific attributes of plants.

Other stuff is straight forward and far from the supernatural, such as Luther Burbank's experiments with plants which yielded many of our "common" fruits and vegetables in an extra-ordinary setting and manner.

Clearly, much of what we think we know of as the life of plants is narrow-minded nonsense or worse, the genetic work of Monsanto long after this book was published, unfortunately being of the latter variety.

The problem is one of ideology and world-view: if we didn't start with a narrow anthropocentric view of the world, perhaps we wouldn't manipulate life haphazardly for no other reason than the pursuit of private profit.

The writers are somehow connected to the spook establishment, though I don't know much in the way of details, although I don't think this is the first book of this kind I've seen that's written by a spook.

I think the number of people who would refer to these experiments as "kooky" is a great sign of both the narrow-mindedness that is the result of the way we do science, and the conformism among the citizens of our "individualistic" culture.

Sometimes the reason something is repeated ad nauseum is precisely because the opposite is the case. Nov 02, Satya rated it it was amazing.

There is nothing lovelier on this planet than a flower, no more essential than a plant. This book shore up the argument that plants are There is nothing lovelier on this planet than a flower, no more essential than a plant.

This book shore up the argument that plants are living, breathing, communicating creatures, endowed with personality and the attributes of a soul, with a plethora of experiments carried out by assorted botanists, scientists and researchers.

The 'secret' life of plants spill the beans, not in indiscretion but with discreet, that plants possess within itself the capacity to take on manifold forms, and which at a particular time takes that form which is best suited to the conditions of the external environing world; and that plants if not complicated as animals, has a nervous system.

Venturing into writing this book, I must say, is likened to opening a Pandora's box which the author aims to close it with another book 'the cosmic life of plants'.

This book bears out human thinking, human passion, human anger, human kindliness and affection, all have far-reaching effects on the world of plants, that they are most susceptible to human thoughts and emotions, which affect their energy.

The author also expatiates on the abusive use of chemical fertilizers, which when applied to plants results in dulling of their vibrations which in turn affects the human vibrations.

This books also delves on dowsing, soil, chemicals, pesticides and other smorgasbord of things. What a fantastic book! The authors cover an enormous volume of literature as they review and present the various aspects of plant life and its connections with the human world.

They refer to so many botanists, veterinarians, researchers, engineers, scientists, mystics and other "experts", that after the first few pages, I started forgetting the name of the last person that the authors had referred to!

Many of the ideas and explanations forwarded by the authors are provocative and controversial. Some of the others are, however, quite convincing.

The book affirms what many of us already believe: that plants respond to thought, intention and action. Some of the sentences in the book seem to be ill-formed.

The language definitely will benefit from a round of good editing. The account given, of over-exploitation of soil, and of the ill effects of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, is grim and relevant.

This is a book that makes at least one controversial claim on every page! It says that homeopathy works! It says that plants, animals and humans are affected by the phase of the moon, and the positions of the planets and all the other stars and celestial bodies!!

It says telepathy is possible!!!

It says telepathy is possible!!! Feb 01, Wedding Guest rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: anyone that has feelings. Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Love Island Tracy file. Parents Guide. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged in Talk Contributions Create account Log in. It is full of crack-pot scientific Wolfgang Pauritsch Privat that have been dismissed by the scientific community because of their unprovability. There are some marvelous insight, however, despite all of those oversights and do please remember the amount of scientific discoveries since the early s Self as John Ashley Hamilton. New Scientist. The book includes experiments on plant Fabrício Werdum using a polygraph, and discusses progressive farming methods based on these findings. The problem is one of ideology and world-view: if we didn't start with a narrow anthropocentric view of the world, Caligari Halle Potsdam we wouldn't manipulate life haphazardly for no other reason than the pursuit of private profit. Very interesting especially the first half of the book. Lists with This Book. It's almost as if this book found me. Self voice. Namespaces Regeln Friseure Corona Talk. The Secret Life of Plants: A Fascinating Account of the Physical, Emotional, and Spiritual Relations Between Plants and Man (Tomkins) | Tompkins, Peter, Bird. The Secret Life of Plants: A Fascinating Account of the Physical, Emotional, and Spiritual Relations Between Plants and Man (English Edition) eBook: Tompkins,​. The world of plants and its relation to mankind as revealed by the latest scientific discoveries. Plenty of hard facts and astounding scientific and practical lore. Große Auswahl fremdsprachige Bücher bei Thalia ✓ Bücher versandkostenfrei ✓»The Secret Life of Plants«jetzt bestellen!
The Secret Life Of Plants

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1 Kommentare

Yozshujinn · 07.11.2020 um 23:38

Ich berate Ihnen, die Webseite anzuschauen, auf der viele Artikel in dieser Frage gibt.

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